Category: Enable high quality audio on linux

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

enable high quality audio on linux

It only takes a minute to sign up. I'm following the Arch Beginner's Guide. I have Arch running. Now I'm working on the post-installation instructions, one of the first parts of which is to unmute the speakers. This is where my problem is. Go to 'Master' then press M and then keep hitting the up key to bring the sound levels up.

I do that for any other inputs I want like pcm etc. You should hear static from each channel in turn. I recommend asoundconfwhich will take care of generating a proper. Unmute it if necessary through either alsamixer ncurses or amixer cli. Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. How do I enable sound in this fresh Arch install? Ask Question. Asked 6 years, 4 months ago.

Active 2 months ago. Viewed 64k times. First, I installed alsamixer pacman -S alsa-utils Then this amixer sset Master unmute I get this error: amixer: Unable to find simple control 'Master',0 I don't know how to proceed.

HalosGhost 4, 9 9 gold badges 23 23 silver badges 37 37 bronze badges.The Daphile is the heart of a digital music system. Its primary focus is in storage and playback of your digital music library. The software solutions of the Daphile are optimized for the best possible audiophile experience. The Daphile supports the most common file formats including high resolution audio.

It manages bit-perfect and gapless playback. The networking capabilities of the Daphile are flexible and easy to setup — both wired and wireless. It can even operate in a standalone mode where it provides a wireless access point for the control device. The Daphile can be controlled from any web-enabled device. There also exists the choice of compatible third party control applications for tablets and smart phones. The Daphile operates as a network-attached storage enabling easy music transfer to its internal storage.

It is also possible to store audio CDs directly to the internal storage by ripping them with a connected optical drive. The CD album metadata and cover are automatically fetched from the Internet during the ripping process.

In addition to internal storage the Daphile can play music from various Internet streaming services as well as from external USB-connected and network-attached storage devices. The Daphile is in many ways an extensible, future proof solution. The core software provided by Daphile is user upgradeable via the Internet. The system functionality can be extended with third party plug-ins. The principal design philosophy for the Daphile has been simplicity and focused functionality to produce a flexible and future proof audiophile component for the era of high resolution digital music.

From the audiophile perspective the digital music listening is finally — first time after the birth of CD — taking a big leap forward. This owes primarily to Internet distribution of lossless and high resolution audio files superior to CD sound quality and High-end asynchronous USB digital-to-analog converters.

And they are worthy of a good partner to supply the music stream for them — not just a computer equipped with a standard operating system.

The Daphile has audiophile optimized software solutions for digital music playback and storage. Its main priority is in providing the bit-perfect continuous audio stream for the connected audio devices. The use of the Daphile is simple and requires no expertize. Initial deployment, networking, music storage, CD ripping, DAC setup, multi-zone usage, external storage usage, software upgrade, etc And for the preference of music control you have a number of excellent options.

Daphile is based on the open source Squeezebox Server, Squeezelite and Linux.

How to Enable and Manage Client Audio Settings for the Citrix Receiver using a Group Policy

Since Daphile is used and configured completely via the web interface the user is not required to have any Linux skills. Overview Features Screenshots Download Contact.

Overview The Daphile is the heart of a digital music system. Philosophy The principal design philosophy for the Daphile has been simplicity and focused functionality to produce a flexible and future proof audiophile component for the era of high resolution digital music. Ease-of-use The use of the Daphile is simple and requires no expertize.

Enjoy the music.A bit of a backstory you can skip it : I use my laptop as my main and portable source of music aside smartphone and I always complained about the quality of sound on my old laptop. Now I bought new one, much expensive one alienware 17 R3 with a dedicated sound card sound blaster and expected to have finally something decent. At first when I heard the music I was disappointed with the lack of dynamic but soon discovered I can boost it by the many options of the sound card by default all was flatted outbut finally when I plugged some cheap usb speakers it really gave a kick.

I can only imagine what it can sound with a quality speakers. The main question here: I compared the sound from spotify on manjaro and windows and there is no doubt, music is soooo much better in windows!

In linux it sounds like from a can. There is no advanced sound card panel as it is for nvidia in linux so maybe I miss something. Maybe I can somehow tweak the sound or use different driver or whatever to obtain comparable quality? I know that my laptop can produce better music in windows so can you help me to get started how can I improve sound quality in linux?

What should I learn, install, check, tweak? This is important to me, because I often play music from my laptop whenever I am and it would suck if I had to switch to windows every time I want to use it. Also in the advanced tab you can configure the channels, audio depth, hz… that actually improve a lot the sound quality:.

I spent some hours a while ago, trying to find those options here in linux.

Installing PulseAudio

But the only thing I could find was the alsamixer levels, you may want to try those, it might improve the quality. The driver might also have something to do with the quality… I mean manufacturer driver vs opensource driver. In my case I have dedicated sound blaster centre with huge amount of options and I did tweak them a bit, because default sound was also not mind blowing.

So I have more then showed on screens above.

enable high quality audio on linux

And where is this daemon. Millions terms and things I have no idea about and when trying to find out one thing I meet even more unknown things. So anyway, I will gladly apply those settings or others suggested to check if sound quality improved but I have no idea what am I doing and I must trust others judgement.

You can create the demon. Pacman will tell you when it puts that pacnew in your system. Also, enable-lfe-remixing should be set to yes if you use a 5. It really depends on what sound card is being used. The CA has a bad reputation when it comes to Linux. Actually, SoundBlaster Z is a known notorious device. There are way too many variants, and only a few of them actually work with the current upstream driver, because of the incompatible binary firmware.

Just set your pulseaudio to a healthy bitrate and resampling and buy a good set of speakers instead. Install beep from repo and check if every frequency sounds equally loud to you. Agreed, buy an audio interface instead like I do. Then why do you need high quality sound for that?

You can enjoy those by hitting the mute button too. I think he wanted to say that headphones is the way to go for him and for me, too. Never need a mute button once you own a pair of headphones man. It looks like linux is capable of higher quality soundonly generic settings a crappy as hell. The wow effect and dynamic is also on linux.

Again, where is it or where to create this asound. If the first piece of linux magic worked, I am curious if this would do something to. HD Audio quality. Poor quality sound.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up.

enable high quality audio on linux

I'm following the Arch Beginner's Guide. I have Arch running. Now I'm working on the post-installation instructions, one of the first parts of which is to unmute the speakers. This is where my problem is. Go to 'Master' then press M and then keep hitting the up key to bring the sound levels up.

I do that for any other inputs I want like pcm etc. You should hear static from each channel in turn. I recommend asoundconfwhich will take care of generating a proper. Unmute it if necessary through either alsamixer ncurses or amixer cli. Sign up to join this community.

The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. How do I enable sound in this fresh Arch install? Ask Question. Asked 6 years, 4 months ago. Active 2 months ago. Viewed 63k times.

Linux Mint identify, fix sound problems, set default device

First, I installed alsamixer pacman -S alsa-utils Then this amixer sset Master unmute I get this error: amixer: Unable to find simple control 'Master',0 I don't know how to proceed. HalosGhost 4, 9 9 gold badges 23 23 silver badges 37 37 bronze badges. Korgan Rivera Korgan Rivera 2, 5 5 gold badges 22 22 silver badges 36 36 bronze badges. EliasProbst I've updated the question with that info. EliasProbst Ok I tried that. I updated the question with the output.

Active Oldest Votes. When setting up a new Arch install I usually do the following: pacman -S alsa-utils Then fire up alsamixer with alsamixer Go to 'Master' then press M and then keep hitting the up key to bring the sound levels up.

Then do speaker-test -c2 with the number being how many channels you want to test.

enable high quality audio on linux

Phil Stephenson Phil Stephenson 3 3 silver badges 7 7 bronze badges. Cole Johnson 5 5 bronze badges.Welcome to LinuxQuestions. You are currently viewing LQ as a guest. By joining our community you will have the ability to post topics, receive our newsletter, use the advanced search, subscribe to threads and access many other special features. Registration is quick, simple and absolutely free. Join our community today!

Note that registered members see fewer ads, and ContentLink is completely disabled once you log in. Are you new to LinuxQuestions. If you need to reset your password, click here. Having a problem logging in? Please visit this page to clear all LQ-related cookies. Introduction to Linux - A Hands on Guide This guide was created as an overview of the Linux Operating System, geared toward new users as an exploration tour and getting started guide, with exercises at the end of each chapter.

For more advanced trainees it can be a desktop reference, and a collection of the base knowledge needed to proceed with system and network administration. This book contains many real life examples derived from the author's experience as a Linux system and network administrator, trainer and consultant. They hope these examples will help you to get a better understanding of the Linux system and that you feel encouraged to try out things on your own.

Click Here to receive this Complete Guide absolutely free. Sound quality in linux. Hi friends, just dont know where to post it One of my friends said that Quote:. Hi, Well, I could say that might be another factors in play, codecs, encoding quality, sound daemon esd, arts, etc From my own experience, I think that sound quality is kinda equal between OSes, however, I enjoy much the sound from linux that from windows when I'd use it.

Normally in my distributions, I always use the alsa kernel drivers as modules and I can't complaing about the quality, the only thing that I first noted using linux was that I could have higher volume by configuring alsamixer xD, but as 'quality' I didn't see much difference.

I think it depends on both the drivers and the codecs and sometimes also program used. It's best to use native codecs if possible, but, this may not be possible.

Some programs also seem to handle music better than others, for example mplayer, you can also choose which audio driver to use in the options. I've heard JACK is one of the better drivers to use it's actually a "low-latency audio server". Firstly, please post the type of audio card you have in your machine. I believe some chipsets do have driver quality issues with Linux, and it would be helpful to try to confirm if your card is one of these.

The program lshw run as root should help you determine this, or maybe just checking the output of dmesg shortrly after boot. Probably you've already tried it, but just in case, make sure the mixer settings are sane The output volume is usually decided by a combination of PCM and Master levels. A too-small PCM level will lead to low output volume, and a lot of hiss.

Also, if you have a Microphone input, make sure the Mic is muted, or at least that mic-input-through-to-output switch is off. If any of these suggestions, or another mixer setting improves the sound quality, please post here what you did in addition to your sound card type, as requested above so others might profit from your solution.

Good luck! Find More Posts by matthewg The fidelity decreases somewhat. Last edited by Ry12; at AM.Posted July 23,Updated February 21,Permalink.

I use VirtualBox to use Ubuntu in a Windows host environment. The one major issue I have is the audio in the Linux Ubuntu guest. Sometimes, especially after using RDP to log into the Windows host, the audio in the Ubuntu guest gets screwed up.

The first thing to do in this situation is to make sure your host audio ie, Windows audio works. Usually changing the volume level will make a sound, or you can load up the Sounds control panel and play some of the sample sounds there. The easy way to test and see if this is the case is using aplay:.

This should play a sound out your speakers or your headphones. However, this is messy, and requires that you shut down your Linux guest virtual machine and restart VirtualBox. Recently I found another solution. Apparently the Intel AC97 driver tries to guess the clock rate of the emulated chip and fails. Note: the file and location may vary depending on the Linux distro — this works in Ubuntu This will kill the audio subsystem and reload it, which will often immediately fix an ongoing audio issue.What is an audio framework?

Why do we need audio frameworks? If you want to use Linux audio for professional work, but have been using Windows up until now, then there are some important differences you need to know about.

This article will help explain the basics of Linux audio, and it will do so by directly comparing each part of the system to the equivalent in Windows.

This is to make it easy for musicians and sound engineers who understand Windows well to switch to Linux and get back their fun and freedom. Operating systems are complex, so even something as seemingly simple as playing back or generating a sound can have multiple layers of applications talking to each other. Diagram 1 — The Linux Sound Stack In software a framework can be thought of as the scaffolding that you build the actual application around.

It can also be thought of as an application, or set of applications, that do nothing until you add the functionality. The audio framework does nothing until another application tells it to play a sound, then it springs into life. What are these mysterious things inside the penguin pyramid? To make your computer actually generate sound requires a huge amount of code, and every program that wants sound does not want to have to write it all from scratch.

To solve this problem the operating system provides a sound framework that all the applications can share. When an application wants to transmit sound out of your speakers, it tells the framework to do the work, and if things go well the sound will pop out of your speakers and into your ears. Diagram 2 — What having no sound stack would look like. Both operating systems are able to provide this, but it is not the default as most general users are not interested in these features, they probably just want to play games or surf the web.

We have talked about audio frameworks, but what about the actual drivers? You may never have heard about audio frameworks before, but only about drivers. Hardware drivers are just PART of the audio framework. They are treated very differently on Windows and Linux. For your hardware to talk to the computer it needs a special middleman called a driver.

This driver tells the computer exactly what your sound card can do, how many input and outputs it has, and very technical things you would probably die of boredom if you tried to understand. There are generic drivers that can work with many different audio interfaces, but pro audio interfaces tend to have all sorts of special features that will need a custom driver. If you want good low latency crash free performance, then the interface needs a good driver written specially for the operating system you are using.

From a users perspective, without knowing about the audio framework, the biggest change going from Windows to Linux is that there is no need to download audio drivers any more. To use a professional audio interface in Windows you will need to download the drivers from the manufacturers web site and install them.

These will almost certainly include an ASIO driver. This type of special driver created by Steinberg will bypass the operating system as much as is possible and enable low latency high quality sound.

Subscribe to RSS

There will probably be another driver included for general Windows use. In Linux all the hardware drivers are built into the Kernel and supplied out of the box with a few exceptions like propriety 3 rd party graphics drivers.

There is nothing to download. This magical place does more than just store all the drivers, it also has software and an API special language computers speak to each other in to communicate with the software above it. The only thing the user needs to be concerned with really is getting an audio interface that has an ALSA sound driver in the Kernel. In the past, this has been a problem, but not so much today.

This is a universal standard that means compatible interfaces will work out of the box in Linux. Here is a useful list of some USB Class 2. The Linux musicians forum hardware section is also a good resource. A big difference from Windows is that in Linux there are other layers above the hardware drivers in ALSA we need to know about. We need to understand they do different things that will either benefit using your computer as an audio workstation with DAW software, or as a general purpose computer watching Youtube and things like that.

Pulse Audio can be thought of as the mainstream standard for normal everyday software.


thoughts on “Enable high quality audio on linux

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *